Nevermind The Posers

See ya in the pit.

On the sound and release of their new album “Love and the Human Outreach”… September 22, 2012

Warped Tour 2012 – July 21 – Nassau Coliseum

DF – David Fowler – Keyboards

SF – Stephen Fowler – Lead Vocals

DTK – Dave the Klone

TNT, as herself

One of the amazing highlights of the 2012 Vans’ Warped Tour was getting to catch an awesome set from, and hang out with Echo Movement, the band from the Jersey shore bringing their own brand of sci-fi to their Reggae / Classic Rock fusion sound.  Take 2 parts Bob Marley, 1 part Beatles and 1 part Pink Floyd, and you just start to scratch the surface of what Echo Movement has perfected with their latest album, Love and the Human Outreach.  The guys were super cool and more than happy to go into depth on the finer points of what makes Love and the Human Outreach more than just a mind-blowing album, but a scientific work of art.

          

   

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TNT:  So it’s already been featured in CNN, MSNBC, Wired Magazine and other media as a scientific work.  Would you explain how this album is a scientific work?

DF:  Yeah, absolutely.  There are two things in there that would qualify as such, three things if you include the subject matter of the lyrics.  The two physical things that are in there, one is…well, actually this is our second album that features binaural beats.  What they are essentially are two sinusoidal frequencies that are ever so slightly out of tune with each other.  And when you pan one of those frequencies hard right, so that it’s only coming out of the right speaker, and you pan the other hard left, so that it’s only coming out of the left speaker, and then put on a set of head phones, your brain goes through a neurological process where it identifies the algorithm between those two frequencies, and it becomes what we call an audible artifact.  It’s something that doesn’t physically exist, but because of a certain exchange among elements, you hear something that may not exactly be there.  To get your brain working that way is always a great thing.

DTK:  Wow, it sounds like you’re creating a certain kind of big bang in someone’s head when they listen to your music.

DF:  Ha. We’d love for that to happen.  If there’s any sort of output of energy, or any sort of transformation of energy, I think that’s a beautiful thing and in this case, it’s a cognitive process that’s responsible.  It’s pretty fascinating because you can use binaural beats, and they have been used for therapeutic reasons.  It’s something we’ve studied for a pretty significant period of time before we used them on the last album.  On this one we used them on the first track, “Rising Sunset,” and a little bit on the second track, “Spaceship Earth.”  I feel like they put you in a nice relaxed state to set you up for the album, and then you proceed from there.

DTK:  That sounds incredible. [Referring to the explanation, as I had not heard the album at this point…but before you ask, yes, those binaural beats worked, and it was so fucking cool.]

DF:  It’s a good way of bridging the gap between reality and the world of the album.

TNT:  Could you explain Reggae Bubble?

DF:  Reggae Bubble is essentially a rhythm that is used commonly in our genre of music, and I guess in our case I’ve updated it or textured it with different sounds, but originally it had started to emerge thirty or forty years ago, if not more.  It’s a great rhythm, because the only beat that’s not hit is the first downbeat of each phrase.  That’s something that’s awkward and foreign and, for the lack-of-better-words, uncouth to any sort of western tradition of music, where everything falls on the down-beat rhythm.

DTK:  So is Reggae something that has always been with you guys, or did it come from growing up in the beach culture?  How did you guys wind up in the genre you’re in, which clearly involves a scientific component as well, so I can’t wait to hear how that plays into this to create Echo Movement.

SF:  You know, as far as Reggae, Bob Marley Legend was one of the first albums I got when I was younger.  We listened to a lot of Bob Marley growing up.  We also listened to Michael Jackson, a lot of Beatles, Pink Floyd, The Doors.  Those were the big players as far as the soundtrack at our house between ourselves and our parents.  Dave, you wanna explain the science-side?

DF:  As far as the science, that’s really just something we wanted to do.  We were into doing research in different areas that we’re interested in as far as from a scientific point of view, and then just use the genre as the communicative medium through which we express these things.  We use it as a vehicle.  Regarding the binaural beats, it’s something I discovered two or three years ago, but they’ve been around for something like 70, 80, 90 years, so it’s existed for some time.  It’s been used in the medical community as a treatment for certain neurological disorders.

DTK:  That’s really cool.

DF:  But the real science project on this album comes as a result of spending the last seven years contacting SETI, the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence…

DTK:  Whoa, really?!  Can I just tell you, I am so happy that’s the direction this is going, myself probably more than TNT.

TNT:  Haha, yeah.

DTK:  As soon as you said SETI, I was like, ‘Ooooooh!! X-Files!!’  So awesome.  So, you contacted SETI.

DF:  I did.  I was looking for any audio they might have that we could possibly use, and I wound up talking to Edna Davore, the Director of Education at SETI.  She introduced me to the Keppler mission, which is a space telescope that trails Earth, with the primary goal of discovering exo-planets, or planets outside our solar system.  To date, since it’s been launched in 2009, it’s discovered over 2500 planets, as dead-on confirmations.  It does this by observing the apparent magnitude of the star, because planets don’t emit light, it has to observe as the planet transits a small cross-section of sky, passing through our line-of-sight between us and the distant star of the galaxy where the planet is orbiting.  Passing in front of the star over a period of time will create a discernible pattern.  That pattern is charted by an organization called PlanetHunters.org, headed up by a Dr. Debra Fischer at Yale University.  So I reached out to her, at Edna’s suggestion, and she was able to talk to me about how to read and understand their charts.  So over a period of months, I searched through the data points on the charts until I found some that seemed to me to be sinusoidal, and something that I thought would translate well into music.  Then I found a sonification team at Georgia Tech, led by Dr. Bruce Walker, and he put one of his undergrads, O’Riley Winton in charge of putting together a small team of undergrads to help me sonify this data.  And over the course of four or five  months, working with them, I would say diligently…

DTK:  Yeah, I second that, diligently sounds like the right word.

DF:  …they came back with some results, and successfully translated this star-data.  The data we used in this case was actually a binary star-system, but they still create a series of data points that oscillate at the rate we were looking for, it just had a more consistent, more stable pattern that was easier for sonification.  On top of that, we “fitted” the data, which is an idea I borrowed from a Dr. Charles Bailyn, also at Yale University, who was doing a lecture series where he discussed how he would “fit” the data.  He discovered radio velocities of stars…so, you know the planet would go around the star, and it would wobble from its center of mass…and he would take those data points, which weren’t as stable because they were Hubble observations, and they used to just “fit” the data in order to make for cleaner digestion of the information.

DTK:  So, it used to be inaccurate and they’d fill in the gaps?

DF:  Well, it was more accurate eventually, but they were able to draw more conclusions and extrapolate more information from the data they had at the time.  Using that information applied to the binary star-system sample we were using, they came up with these sounds.  So when I got them back, I composed them into a five-part harmony and put it on the album, and then we dedicated it to Carl Sagan.

DTK:  Oh my God, that’s so awesome.  So now how many songs is this going to be happening in?  I mean people are going to be hearing these star sounds and not even be realizing that this is part of the music, right?

DF:  That’s fine.  If they don’t understand, that’s absolutely fine.  And those who do, more power to them.  It’s no problem.  At the end of the day, someone made a comment that they could’ve made these same sounds on their CASIO.  And I thought to myself, ‘Yeah, so could I have.  But what you can’t do, is make those sounds from a binary star-system on the other side of the galaxy.

DTK:  I love that you guys are hiding all of these little…I like to call them clues.  These would be kinda like, for people like me who watched the show LOST, these would be the Easter Eggs that are being left to explain what’s really going on.  I mean, the fact that scientists are actually figuring out where other planets are, and if they’d be able to support human life, and all while we’re sitting here drinking lemonade and listening to music, this is what the universe is throwing around, all around you.  I think it’s awesome you guys are incorporating that into your music.

DF:  Those scientists make very easy idols.  I idolize them, we idolize them, and they’re just fantastic human beings who are looking out for knowledge and the welfare and the progress of humanity.  We honor them through our music when we do things like this.

DTK:  Congratulations, guys.  That is definitely a lot of work, and I can’t wait to hear this for myself.

TNT:  What are some of the other bands you guys have seen on the Warped Tour that you’ve liked?

DF:  The top of that list is Streetlight Manifesto.

TNT:  How about the band name?  Can you tell us, does it have any meaning, where did it come from?

SF:  We are part of the echo generation.  The echo generation are the sons and daughters of the baby boomer generation.  Dave thought of the name.  He came up to me one day and was like, I thought of this…how about Echo Movement, like the movement of our generation, the momentum that is going to bring about big changes.

DTK:  Have you been seeing any of these big changes happening yet?

DF:  They happen at the pace of life.

SF:  I’ll tell you what, technologically we are moving at such an exponential rate, it’s noteworthy.

DTK:  Scary even.

SF:  If you think about it, hundreds of years ago, a father would teach his son a skill, I don’t know, how to make an ax or something.  And then the son would teach his son, who would teach his son, and so on, and so on.  It would always be the same exact method to make the ax; they’d heat the metal to the same temperature, they’d use the same materials, they’d live their whole lives in the same small town.  Now, every year we get new cell phones, with completely new applications and completely new technologies and peripherals that we hook up.  I mean, it’s like Ray Kurtzweil says, do you know Ray Kurtzweil?

DTK:  Of course, the singularity.

SF:  Yup, the singularity.  Some of the predictions he’s making are just awesome.  We’re going to have the human brain mapped out, in another two decades or so he’s estimating, and he’s been right about a lot of things.

DTK:  I think I had read that he thinks by 2025 we’ll have the human brain reverse engineered.

SF:  I mean, think about that.  We’re on the cusp of being able to digitize what a human brain is, and if you can do that, well then what defines a human, what is a human being?  Is it a collection of thoughts and memories, are we tissue, are we spiritual or what are we?

DTK:  I suggest you check out Battlestar Galactica if you have free time after the tour.

TNT:  Oh, God.  It’s so not for me.  Are you guys’ fans?

SF:  No.

DF:  No.  I think Noles is a fan though.

SF:  The only reason I know about it is through friends and now that you mention it, yes I believe that Noles is somehow a fan.

TNT:  Anyway, so did you guys catch Streetlight Manifesto today?

DF:  Not today, but we try to catch them as often as we can.  They’re pretty good friends of ours.

TNT:  Have you played together live or on albums?

SF:  Dave has.

DF:  We played a 5-show run with them in late 2009, and we’ve played with them on a couple isolated dates since then.

SF:  When I said, ‘Dave has,’ I meant he’s played on albums with them.

DF:  I played on their album 99 Songs of Revolution: Vol. 1, I played the organ solo on “Skyscraper,” which is a cover of a Bad Religion song.

DTK:  Nice.

TNT:  So, do you think sponsorships are the best way to tour and get around?  How did you guys start getting sponsors?  Is there a process?

DF:  It’s enabling.  Any sort of capital is enabling in a capitalist society.

SF:  It’s unfortunate that artists have to worry about such things.  But the sponsors that we’ve been lucky enough to hook up with are really, really cool.  Like Silver Surfer Vaporizors.  We hung out with them when we were in Denver.  They were awesome.

 

Don’t forget to order your copy of Love and the Human Outreach, out now!  If you hurry, you might be able to catch the limited edition version, which includes a piece of art from Brothers With Glass featuring the album cover-art!  Go my friends, be awesome and spread the word and music of Echo Movement.  Nevermind the Posers shares new music with you so that you can share new music you discover here with the world.

 

Van’s Warped Tour 2012 – Photo Pit Scrapbook August 6, 2012

Check out Dave The Klone’s photos from this year’s Warped Tour at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on July 21st, 2012.

 

Streetlight Manifesto and Reel Big Fish December 16, 2011

Review by Jake Davis

Rodeo Ruby Love

When buying tickets to a show with either Streetlight Manifesto or Reel Big Fish, any skanker worth his checkered shoes knows he’s in for a good show.  Nonetheless, I entered Webster with a certain amount of apprehension.  Could all the stories people have told me about these two bands live be untrue?  My friends, I come to you with joyous news.  I have seen heaven on stage.  I can say with all certainty there isn’t a better live show than Streetlight Manifesto or Reel Big Fish, and the fantastic openers that preceded them.  On that note, certainly the biggest surprise of the night was not one, but two amazing openers.  I will say the first band, Rodeo Ruby Love, even though they were a great act, seemed a little out-of-place.  The Indiana natives have a wonderful mix of upbeat ska tunes (oddly lacking a brass section on stage), the best of which was a horn-tinged number called “Rickey Henderson.”  They were a little soft and slow in tempo compared to the rest of the groups, and because they were opening the show, had a bit of a lukewarm reception from the rowdy bigger-name hungry audience.  The best part of the suspicious interaction between band and crowd was the extremely funny self-conscious looks of complete uncomfort the rhythm guitarist had on his face.  To top it off, their mixing seemed a little off, drowning out the vocalists with guitar fuzz.  Listening to them now, I cannot say enough good things about them, considering their tight sound and often-hilarious lyrics.  My one piece of advice to the band: Give Annie Cheek (the female vocalist) some sort of instrument on stage so she doesn’t stand there looking so endearingly awkward as she waits for the next bit of her lyrics to kick in.

Lionize

The next band to play was Lionize, who my friend dryly remarked that he wouldn’t want to meet any of these guys in a dark alley, are certainly a physically imposing, heavily  bearded band.  When a huge white guy, decked out with a lumberjack beard came out on stage, my first reaction was, “Oh, God, another lame, loud, grunge knockoff band.”  Readers, learn to never trust my first impressions.  To start, the lead singer had a beautiful voice, and his crystal clear lyrics cut straight through the crowd.  This is one band that no one saw coming, but no one wanted to leave after their first song.  Between a wonderful vocalist, a truly amazing keyboardist who laid out incredible organ riffs and superbly tight drum lines, this band impressed like no other.  Its one thing going into a show and knowing the band will be great and another matter entirely for one to come out like a bolt out of the blue. This is one hard-edged reggae band I’ll keep coming back to again and again.

Streetlight Manifesto

And now, the moment I couldn’t wait for…Streetlight Manifesto takes the stage.  The opening notes of “Watch It Crash” hit our collective audience ears.  No matter how steady I wanted to keep my camera, I couldn’t help but screaming “Mercy, mercy, mercy me!” when the chorus came about.  They played an incredible set, I only wish it lasted longer.  They played 10 amazingly created songs.  I cannot express how great they were, but I must confess, Reel Big Fish I looked forward to more and was ultimately more entertaining.

When they came on stage accompanied, of course, by the Superman theme song, the crowd just about lost it.  I think a sweaty, shirtless man next to me began to cry.  I rushed to the front of the photo pit, and used the majority of my camera’s memory on this incredibly charismatic band.  They danced, sang, make bawdy jokes, sang “Suburban Rhythm” countless times in different styles and took pity on the short kid among the huge security guards and looked right at the camera multiple times.  If that grandiose run on sentence didn’t prove it to you, they were unbelievable.  Better than anyone had ever told me, and I implore anyone to see them.  Take a train, bus, learn to fly, rent a camel, I don’t care.  Just go.  This band gets me so excited, and really, as the guy in the “Bitchin’” shirt could tell you, you should be too.
 

 

Reel Big Fish Interview, 7/17/10 Warped Tour @ Nassau Coliseum August 13, 2010

Interview by Angela Blasi

Angela Blasi: I’m here speaking with Reel Big Fish and for the record you are…
Reel Big Fish: Aaron Barrett and Dan Regan from the Reel Big Fish!

AB: It’s kind of late in the day, how’s Warped tour been so far for NY?
Barrett: So far so good, we haven’t played yet.
Regan: We have a lot of time to get pumped up…and eat live cobras…get ready.
Barrett: We’ve been going on first or last this tour.  I prefer last.

AB: You guys get to close the show pretty much?
Barrett: Yeah, at 11am I like to be sleeping.  That’s why I chose the rock n’ roll touring lifestyle, so I could be asleep at noon.

AB: What do you normally do to get ready for a show, before you hit the stage?  Any pre-show rituals?
Regan: We avoid each other so that when we get on stage, its magic.  It’s like were seeing each other for the first time, like a new-born fawn falling out of its mother.
Barrett: We all change our clothes at the same time on the bus…try not to look at each others balls.

AB: Hows that workin’ out?
Barrett: Awful.  We love balls.
Regan: It’s so hard not to look at the balls.

AB: We are a music blog called Nevermind the Posers, and we’re dedicated to keeping music real.  Now, you guys play a lot of colleges, which I love that you still do despite your fame.  What is it about playing colleges and that type of environment that keeps you coming back?
Barrett: We pretty much play anywhere we’re invited.  That’s why.  A lot of colleges ask us, so we go play for ‘em.
Regan: We would play the Playland at Mcdonalds if they wanted to have us.
Barrett: If someone said ‘hey come and set it up,’ we’d do it.  We definitely try to play a variety of gig.  Tours of the UK where we’re playing fairly small venues, sometimes we’re playing giant festivals like this, or sometimes colleges, even acoustic invite only things.  We really try to spread it out, it keeps it fresh.

AB: Do you find it keeps you on an even keel?
Regan: Definitely, and the unifying factor in all of this that the fans are always so awesome and they’ll come out and see whatever.

AB: Not gonna lie, the first time I ever saw you guys was at a college in Vermont in the middle of nowhere.
Regan: Vermont is the middle of nowhere though, so that’s kinda redundant.

AB: I admired that though.  It was great that you guys were still out there giving it your all.  I’ve noticed that your live show comes across with a lot of energy, a lot of fun.  Is that something you strive for or does it just come naturally?
Barrett and Regan: Oh yeah, definitely.
Regan: We’re pretty awkward people in regular life, so we get on stage and it’s like we can finally relax and be awkward…professionally.
Barrett: We like to play, so we have a lot of fun being up on stage.

AB: Is there something you guys like to do, a favorite song you like to play, a certain gimmick, something you love doing for the audience that they always react to?
Barrett: Any song that they go crazy for.  I like doing that.  It starts, they recognize it and they start screaming and going crazy.

AB: Any top songs?
Barrett:  The “Beer” song, “Take on Me,” and “She Has A Girlfriend Now.”

AB: Have you found any other bands on this tour that you’ve gotten into, discovered or become fans of?
Regan: Nothing has jumped out yet, there’s a band people keep telling us to check out that’s a blue grassy thing- The Reverend Payton and his Big Damn Band.  We’re kind of waiting to see a lot of our friends, like Streetlight [Manifesto] and Chase Long Beach, then there will be more horn players hanging out.
Barrett: I saw a cool reggae band today called Tomorrows Bad Seeds.  Kind of like the reggae rock thing.

AB: Ok, last question.  Being that we’re Nevermind the Posers, we like to ask people how they define a poser.  So in your own words, as bluntly and as vulgarly as you’d like, what’s your definition of a poser?
Regan: It’s hard, you know, our style of music definitely brings an eclectic group of people together.  You got a lot of people who only know about us from radio and Baseketball maybe, or a lot of little band geeks.  Which, that’s me.  We’re an all-encompassing group.  I’d say…how to recognize a poser…usually they’re wearing some kind of pro-sports team attire.  Because that’s like instant inclusion.  It’s like,  ‘hey we’re friends automatically because we shopped at the same mall shop.’
Barrett: Oh man, you just pissed off a whole lot of people just then…sports fans get angry.  A poser…someone who tries way too hard to have a certain look or certain uniform for a music style or something.  Gotta have the perfect mohawk, the tightest pants, sleeviest tattoo sleeve.
Regan
: You can always spot the poser, they’re trying the hardest.  You should be practicing your instrument not doing your hair.
Barrett
: You should enjoy the music and what you do, not if people can tell how punk rock or hardcore or how whatever you are.

AB: I feel like you guys definitely stay true to yourselves and do just that.
Barrett: I don’t care what anyone thinks or if anyone knows what kind of music I listen to or if I’m cool or not.
Regan: He can say that because he’s so damn cool.
Barrett: I know, I’m that cool and I don’t care.

AB: To wrap up, you’ve been interviewing all day, is there anything you want to share with us or your fans that you haven’t been asked.  Maybe something you’d like to promote, anything?
Regan: Just get out there and see the show.  We love to see everyone come out to shows and boogie.
Barrett: We love to play, so come watch us do it.  Because if you’re not there, it’s really awkward, just an empty room.

 

A Walk Through Warped Tour- 7/18/10 @ Monmouth Park Racetrack

Review by TNT

Bands I saw: AM Taxi, Face to Face, Left Alone, Anarbor, The Sparring, The Casualties, All American Rejects, Sum 41, The Mighty Regis, and Alkaline Trio
Bands I wish I saw: Reel Big Fish, Andrew W.K., The Flatliners, Tomorrows Bad Seeds, Middle Finger Salute, and Riverboat Gamblers

It doesn’t feel like summer until the Vans Warped Tour rolls into town.  I’ve gone consecutively since 2003 and before I journey to the tour, I’m always convinced it’s Christmas morning.  Well, at least that’s what it feels like to me.  I describe it as one of the most exciting feelings in the world…knowing you’re going to see a festival that lasts all day with some of the greatest punk and rock n’ roll bands around (from legends to up and coming artists), knowing that you’re going to discover loads of new music, and meet some cool people who actually enjoy the same music as you.  Now, I know there has been an increase in posers at the Warped Tour, but if you think about it like that, you’re not going to experience the same overwhelming excitement-filled feeling.  There are posers everywhere, let’s face the fact that there isn’t much we can do about it other than try to set them on the right path (and perhaps introduce them to this website).

I’d also like to note that Kevin Lyman, creator of the Warped Tour, does not pick the bands based on what YOU listen to.  When you create your own US/Canada tour, you can choose whoever you want to play.  If the bands were the same every single year or there was a limited variety of genres or if unsigned bands weren’t given a chance, I think it would get pretty boring and repetitive.  I also understand that if he didn’t go somewhat of the corporate route (mainly finding such huge sponsors in addition to Vans), this tour would not be able to go so far.  If you have beef with the tour because you think it “went corporate” or “sold out” then you obviously don’t know how expensive it is to financially support a tour of this size.  I would also like to thank Lyman for keeping the price of a ticket as low as possible and getting the tour to think and act green.

With all that being said, I did have a couple of gripes with the tour this year.  First of all, the NJ/NY dates were gypped out of seeing practically all the worth-while headliners: Anti-Flag, Big D and the Kid’s Table, The Dickies, Dropkick Murphys, Everclear, Street Sweeper Social Club, Streetlight Manifesto (they’re from NJ!) and The Bouncing Souls (also from the NJ/NYC area) were NOT in attendance.  What the fuck?  Without these acts, I feel like our ticket prices should have been cut in half.  Big freakin’ whoop; All American Rejects and Sum 41 don’t even compare to the bands I just listed.  I’m hoping some of them have upcoming concerts in the area, at least that would justify why they skipped NJ.  Secondly, due to an immense amount of traffic (half was from tour congestion and the other half was shore traffic), I was unable to see two of the greatest acts to play the NJ date.  Andrew W.K. and Reel Big Fish were the first acts to play.  I know I’m the only one to blame for this, since the acts are randomly picked for time slots on said day throughout the tour, but it still grinds my gears.  At least we snagged an interview with Andrew W.K. (will be posted soon).

Trying not to let the NJ line up bother me, my hungry ears and I were on the hunt for some new music.  The first band I stumbled upon was AM Taxi, a punk rock band from Chicago.  Let me explain filing AM Taxi under the punk rock category…they have both elements, in their natural form.  Punk lyrics are noted with simple chords and the guitar riffs are pure rock n’ roll, with driving drums beats that bring it all together.  There is also somewhat of a modern pop hook here, an edge that pulls you in.  I was impressed, especially with their lyrics and energy.  “The Mistake” is extremely well written with lyrics that stun you, (much like Brand New did for me back in the day) and the keys really bring this song together.  It’s hard to say punk music has a heart, but AM Taxi does, their music just hits home.  Right after their set, I made a personal note to pick up their latest album We Don’t Stand A Chance.

Coming back from an ever-changing line up and a long hiatus, Face to Face was the next band I sought out.  What a performance!  It’s been way too long and I was so excited to see them play.  I file Face to Face as one of the original Warped Tour bands, also included are Bad Religion, Anti-Flag, NOFX, and The Casualties.  Face to Face is fucking back and they’re releasing a new album this fall entitled Laugh Now, Laugh Later.  It was great to hear them play again and I pray they’re on the tour in 2011.  SoCal punk rock (F2F since 1991) will never die.

Left Alone was up next.  They remind me of Rancid so much; people look at me like I’m crazy when I say this, but that’s what I hear!  I guess Tim Armstrong and I have similar ears because after hearing Lonely Starts and Broken Hearts in 2004, he signed this band to his label, Hellcat Records.  Straight up, Left Alone is fast punk music with three chords and ska influences.  “Out of Tune Melody” made for a perfect circle pit.  I think I relate with Left Alone so well because they are a true DIY band.  Frontman Elvis Cortez started off as a roadie on the 2003 Warped Tour and when Lyman heard some music from the band, he appointed the band as the official Warped Tour BBQ band in 2004 and 2005.  I’m happy to see their hard work has paid off, as they officially played the tour this year.  See?  Sometimes all you need is good music and the rest will follow.

After Left Alone, I decided to check out what the hype was about with the band Anarbor.  Until today, I never gave the band a fair chance, but I’m glad I caught some songs.  I loved “You and I”; I feel that majority of pop rock bands would make this way more whiny and annoying.  Kudos.  I loved the lyrics in “Always Dirty, Never Clean” – ‘I’ve got bruises on my hands and knees/And a list of failures in between/Always dirty, I am never clean/Music is what you hear, and not what you see.’  When I get older and start doing needle-points and other old lady shit, I’m going to stitch this on a pillow.  “Gypsy Woman” has a great beat that makes it hard to stand still, but its not my favorite song.  I just hear Cage the Elephant and nothing else.  Anarbor released their first full length album on Hopeless records, 4/20/2010.

As I was getting read for Warped Tour this year, pre-listening to the bands, I came across The Sparring (Old Shoe Records) and knew they could not be missed.  Lead singer Joel Bourne cleared a space for himself to perform in front of the stage, stopping festival goers to stay for some music and pouring Monster Energy Drink on fans waiting in line for some meet n’ greet.  He stated that you can’t enjoy live music if you’re waiting in line for an autograph.  I say right on brother!  Borne had much to say, screaming his sarcastic punk lyrics.  This trio is powerful and I predict a solid future for them in the DIY punk rock community.  I recommend catching a live show soon.  Fair warning, the pit will be dangerous so be sure to bring it!

Being crunched for time, I was only able to catch one song from The Casualties.  Watching from the side of the stage, I felt like I was experiencing The Casualties (and the tour) for the first time all over again.

All American Rejects and Sum 41 performances left me with one question: Why?  I love the singles by All American Rejects, but never listened to the rest of their music.  Their big hits were of course covered; “Dirty Little Secrets,” “Swing, Swing,” and “Gives You Hell” were all played.  It was a good performance, but I felt like the members were distant, didn’t feel a connection.  It wasn’t an absent of energy, that was there, it just felt a little forced.  Perhaps the weight of touring has gotten the best of them on this particular date.  Lead Singer Tyson Ritter was promoting the campaign “Don’t Hate on Haiti”, spray painted on his white suit, with a clear mission statement being that if you forget about this disaster, its hatred.  He stated that he was touring to help raise money to build clean water wells for the people of Haiti.  Very noble.

With Sum 41, it felt like they were trying to relive their glory days with hits like “Fat Lip,” “All To Blame” and “The Hell Song”.  Their latest album, All the Good Shit: 14 Solid Gold Hits 2000-2008, was released in November 2008 and rumors of a new album in 2011 are buzzing around too.  Honestly, I miss Dave Baksh.  He brought a heavier punk sound to the group with his guitar style and it is missed.  I was less than thrilled with Sum 41.  I do wish Deryck Whibley a speedy recover though.  In Japan, where the band was set to play the Summer Sonic Rock Festival, Whibley was attacked on 8/6/10 in a bar by three men (and police) and aggravated a slipped disk injury in his back from 2007.

I wanted to like The Mighty Regis, but I just couldn’t.  They had a great performance, but for me it felt too much like they were impersonating Flogging Molly.  Both bands have seven members (6 male, 1 female), play the same instruments, and are both Celtic punk rock bands from Los Angeles.  It’s similar to the great debate of The Grateful Dead vs. Phish.  I was never able to get into Phish because I’m a deadhead and never saw (or heard) the point of getting into practically the same band.

Finally!  It was time to check out Alkaline Trio!  What a stellar performance, as usual!  I was happy to hear “Armageddon” and “Private Eye”, as From Here to Infirmary is an all-time favorite album of mine.  Personally, I haven’t seen Alkaline Trio live in some time, so every song was amazing to me; tons of energy, guts and love.  Also, the crowd was huge.  On their speakers, they stenciled on “Free the WM3″ and “WM3.org”.  I am so touched that bands today are still supporting the West Memphis Three but furious that they’re still in jail.  Please visit WM3.org to find out what you can do to support and free the WM3.

In final summation, here are my thoughts on the tour this year:  Although I missed the majority of the bands I was excited to see, I made the most of the day.  I understand that set times are randomly selected every day of the tour, but it still stinks that I missed out on a few great acts.  Oh well, there’s always next year.  I discovered a lot of new music and look forward to checking out more music by said bands.  Nevermind the Posers has attended Vans Warped Tour since 2003 and we’re looking forward to the lineup in 2011.

Don’t forget, to check out the bands mentioned in this review simply click on their names; they are linked to their MySpace pages.

 

 
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